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Stress Blocks Cellular Function

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Stress Blocks Cellular Function

March 06,2019

Macquarie Stem Cells has provided this information to educate the public based on peer reviewed, published scientific and medical documents. We don’t aim to encourage consumers to seek out such treatments prior to an assessment by a health professional to determine your suitability for treatment. This is obtained directly from the NCBI Pubmed.  We aim to provide you with an unbiased range of treatments that are available aside from biological therapy, This is discussed in ‘other-options’  page on our website.

This is a very interesting article as it contains 2 fantastic publications combined into one.

First, we need to understand the phenomenon called “oxidative stress”. This is an imbalance between production and accumulation of oxygen reactive species (ROS) in cells and tissues, as well as the ability of a biological system to detoxify these reactive products. ROS is also typically known as a by-product of oxygen when it metabolises. The ROS is responsible for many roles in our bodies, one of the key responsibilities is cell communications.

In addition, there also environmental stressors such as ultra violet radiation, ionizing radiations as well as pollutants that we breathe in, consume orally or touch regularly. These pollutants also greatly increase ROS production.  Increased stress factors can create an imbalance in ROS, which can lead to oxidative stress.

Important to note, oxidative stress is not always bad for human health. However, in this article we will be discussing the negative aspects of oxidative stress related to your biological processes.

Over the years as ROS has been observed, there is increasing evidence that shows ROS affects DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. There are many sources of ROS production during the cell differentiation process in our body. If you were not aware, cell differentiation is the process where by one cell type can become another cell type. By observing several pathways that relate to cell differentiaion, we are now able to observe elevated levels of ROS.

The elevated levels of ROS can stop the differentiation function of cells, this in turn can lead to cell death (apoptosis). What does this mean for you? It means, we need to try to manage the oxidative stress process in our bodies to ensure we do not block cell function. One of the best ways to manage the oxidative stress process is to learn what stresses you out in life. Then, learn to manage and overcome that stress by a series of activities, breathing patterns, or anything positive that works for you.

There is no doubt, we will live far greater lives if we can control stress. Your cells would agree.

Scientific abstracts can be found in the sections below. In addition, we can also supply these papers if you wish.

ARTICLE 1

TITLE: “Oxidative Stress: Harms and Benefits for Human Health”(Pizzino et al., 2017)

Published: 27 Jul 2017
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity Journal

Abstract

“Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The multipotent stem cell component of MSC isolates is able to differentiate into derivatives of the mesodermal lineage including adipocytes, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and myocytes. Many common pathways have been described in the regulation of adipogenesis and osteogenesis. However, stimulation of osteogenesis appears to suppress adipogenesis and vice-versa. Increasing evidence implicates a tight regulation of these processes by reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are short-lived oxygen-containing molecules that display high chemical reactivity toward DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. Mitochondrial complexes I and III, and the NADPH oxidase isoform NOX4 are major sources of ROS production during MSC differentiation. ROS are thought to interact with several pathways that affect the transcription machinery required for MSC differentiation including the Wnt, Hedgehog, and FOXO signaling cascades. On the other hand, elevated levels of ROS, defined as oxidative stress, lead to arrest of the MSC cell cycle and apoptosis. Tightly regulated levels of ROS are therefore critical for MSC terminal differentiation, although the precise sources, localization, levels and the exact species of ROS implicated remain to be determined. This review provides a detailed overview of the influence of ROS on adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation in MSCs.” (Pizzino et al., 2017)

REF: Pizzino, G., Irrera, N., Cucinotta, M., Pallio, G., Mannino, F., Arcoraci, V., Squadrito, F., Altavilla, D. and Bitto, A. (2017). Oxidative Stress: Harms and Benefits for Human Health. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, 2017, pp.1-13.

TITLE: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Mesenchymal
Stem Cell Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation: A Review(Atashi, Modarressi and Pepper, 2015)

Published: 15 May 2015
Stem Cells and Development Journal

Abstract

“Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The multipotent stem cell component of MSC isolates is able to differentiate into derivatives of the mesodermal lineage including adipocytes, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and myocytes. Many common pathways have been described in the regulation of adipogenesis and osteogenesis. However, stimulation of osteogenesis appears to suppress adipogenesis and vice-versa. Increasing evidence implicates a tight regulation of these processes by reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are short-lived oxygen-containing molecules that display high chemical reactivity toward DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. Mitochondrial complexes I and III, and the NADPH oxidase isoform NOX4 are major sources of ROS production during MSC differentiation. ROS are thought to interact with several pathways that affect the transcription machinery required for MSC differentiation including the Wnt, Hedgehog, and FOXO signaling cascades. On the other hand, elevated levels of ROS, defined as oxidative stress, lead to arrest of the MSC cell cycle and apoptosis. Tightly regulated levels of ROS are therefore critical for MSC terminal differentiation, although the precise sources, localization, levels and the exact species of ROS implicated remain to be determined. This review provides a detailed overview of the influence of ROS on adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation in MSCs.” (Atashi, Modarressi and Pepper, 2015)

REF:Atashi, F., Modarressi, A. and Pepper, M. (2015). The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation: A Review. Stem Cells and Development, 24(10), pp.1150-1163.

TAGS: Macquarie Stem Cells, Possibilities of Biological Treatments, Focusing on Osteoarthritis, Macquarie Stem Cells treating osteoarthritis, Dr. Ralph Bright biological treatment, Stress, cell and stress relation, oxidative stress,

 

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